Fishing rights are one of the big prizes for the tiny Passamaquoddy First Nation in southern New Brunswick as it negotiates status recognition with the government of Canada. (Steve Bruce/CBC) ReporterPaul Withers
Another Indigenous fishery is in the works in the Maritimes — and this one has international implications.
Fishing rights are one of the big prizes for the tiny Passamaquoddy First Nation in southern New Brunswick as it negotiates “status” recognition with the government of Canada.With that recognition, the Indigenous community, which also refers to itself as Peskotomuhkati, would qualify for fishery access accorded to other status First Nations in the region.
There are about 350 members in the Passamaquoddy Schoodic Band in Canada. However, the Passamaquoddy homeland straddles the New Brunswick-Maine border.If Canada recognizes the Passamaquoddy, some are wondering if that would also allow the much larger Maine population of 3,000 to fish in Canadian waters.Some fishermen are worried about how status recognition for the Passamaquoddy could affect their income. (Canadian Press)
“They fish year-round in the United States, so it’s a concern to people who fish in the Passamaquoddy Bay because it’s such a small bay,” said Bradley Small, a commercial scallop fisherman and president of the Fundy North Fishermen’s Association.Another sensitivity is whether that fishing occurs out of season, when commercial fishing is not permitted in Canada for conservation reasons.
“One of the hurdles we have is they fish in a different manner,” Small said.
Read More at:: N.B. First Nation seeking access to fishery has international implications – Nova Scotia – CBC News

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